Viewing: Design


Apple claims its exterior glass cladding represents the "world's largest curved glass panels." courtesy: apple

Thursday February 23, 2017 | by Andrew Page

ARCHITECTURE: Glass plays lead role in new state-of-the-art Apple headquarters by Foster + Partners

Apple employees will be moving their desks to the much-anticipated new headquarters, Apple Park, sometime in April, according to a company press release, even though the construction process on the Santa Clara Valley, California, facility won't be complete until fall 2017. Billed as one of the world's most energy-efficient buildings thanks to its massive rooftop solar array and a natural ventilation system that is projected to need no heat or air conditioning 9 months of the year, the massive ring-shaped central building designed by Foster + Partners also claims to have the world's largest curved glass panels, which clad the space-ship like structure in seamless sheets of silica. Over 12,000 people will eventually occupy the new complex when it's fully occupied. The main building alone will provide 2.8 million square feet of space.

Continue Reading

Anna Boothe, Amber Sentient

Tuesday January 10, 2017 | by Andrew Page

OPENING: Anna Boothe’s perfume bottles in group exhibition about scent

Practically across Fifth Avenue from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan, the Tambaran Gallery will show work by a painter, perfumer, and glass artist in a collaborative project exploring the power of scent through history. Painter Frances Middendorf, perfumer Leonardo Opali, and glass artist Anna Boothe have been working together on "The Scent Project," which has seen four exhibitions of their evolving bodies of work — two in Connecticut, and two in Venice.

Continue Reading

Sunday June 19, 2016 | by Andrew Page

Reporter shatters misconception of fragility on longest glass footbridge set to open in China

Filed under: Architecture, Design, News, Video


It would take extraordinary strength to breach three sheets of glass laminated together with ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), yet high-profile structural applications, such as high-altitude footbridges in China, continue to awe the public who associate glass with fragility and a tendency to shatter. In an effort to dispell this unwarranted fear of walking on glass, a BBC reporter was invited to try to break a structural glass panel shortly before the opening of the world's highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge, which is expected to open in July 2016 in Zhangjiajie, China.

Continue Reading

The "Oled Moon Chandelier" by Dominic Harris & Cinimod Studio places OLED panels inside a polished acrylic sphere, and is featured on the OLEDWorks Website.

Wednesday May 11, 2016 | by Andrew Page

CALL FOR ENTRIES: Design competition offers $10,000 award for OLED “Lighting without a Bulb” contest

Lesser known than their more commercially developed LED counterparts, OLEDs generate broad-spectrum light that is far closer to the light cast by incandescent light bulbs than the harsh whiteness associated with LEDs. An OLED is a sandwich made up of an organic material layered between two electrodes, and these layers are deposited (they can be printed with an ink-ket) onto a transparent substrate. The many advantages of OLED technology — better quality of light, potentially lower cost than LED if mass produced, cool temperatures, higher response times if used for displays versus backlit LCD screens — must be balanced against the comparatively shorter lifespan and changing color balance over time, problems that are being addressed by researchers. Advances in OLED engineering hold great potential for the technology not only for touch-screens (where they are already being used in some smartphones), but for ambient lighting as well. A new design competition co-sponsored by Corning Inc. and the OLEDWorks company, is seeking innovative lighting designs incorporating today's OLED technology, and is offering $10,000 cash awards as well as opportunities to develop prototypes for winning ideas.

Continue Reading

OFFCENTRE's Wrinkled Lanterns are said to "capture the malleable, organic nature of hot glass. Each piece is hand-made by deconstructing blown glass forms, allowing them to wrinkle and collapse."

Tuesday May 3, 2016 | by Andrew Page

OPENING: Glass lighting and sculpture installation at NYC apparel store

Filed under: Announcements, Design, Opening

The duo of Romina Gonzales and Edison Zapata, whose collaborative design-make project is called Offcentre, will have an opening reception this evening for their installation at the clothing chain Peruvian Connection's Upper West Side store in New York City. Running from 6 PM to 8 PM at the apparel company's location at 341 Columbus Avenue, wine and light food will be served.

Continue Reading

Josef Hoffmann, Goblets, 1923, 1922. Mold-blown yellow and violet glass. Manufactured in Bohemia for Werkstätte, collection: mak

Tuesday April 5, 2016 | by Andrew Page

OPENING: Glass designed by masters of Viennese Modernism at Le Stanze del Vetro

On April 18th, a new exhibition entitled "Glass of the Architects. Vienna 1900-1937," organized by Le Stanze del Vetro, will open at this center of glass scholarship and exhibition in Venice, Italy. With the cooperation of the MAK — Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna, Austria, Le Stanze has assembled key works in glass designed by seminal architects and designers of a unique era of innovation including Josef Hoffman, Koloman Moser, Joseph Maria Olbrich, Leopold Bauer, Otto Prutscher, Oskar Strnad, Oswald Haerdtl, and Adolf Loos. Running through July 31, 2016, the exhibition, which is curated by MAK curator Rainald Franz, includes more than 300 individual works notable for their embodiment of the period's restless search for new form that marked the turn of the 20th century through the escalating conflicts that led to World War II. Even before this movement was labeled "Modernism," there was a widespread feeling that established styles were out of date and something new was needed.

Continue Reading

MIT Glass Lab head Peter Houk consulting with MIT Director of Collections Deborah Douglas.

Wednesday November 18, 2015 | by Andrew Page

CURIOSITIES: MIT’s Peter Houk interviewed about unearthed 1957 glass time capsule

Even before construction of the new nanotechnology lab at MIT has been completed, the facility is already yielding unexpected discoveries. Workers digging into the campus near Building 26 unearthed a sealed glass time capsule that had been buried in 1957 by students and their famous MIT professor Harold Edgerton (1903 – 1990), best known for his strobe photography that froze splashing liquid or the impact of bullets and explosions. The flameworked capsule stuffed with paper and scientific samples bears clear instructions not to open until 2957, or 1,000 years from its time of burial. In an official MIT video, director of collections Deborah Douglas talked about what remains enclosed in the sealed capsule. Whether it will be opened or not is unclear from the video.

Continue Reading

The iconic bottle is so well-known, it even played a starring role in a major motion picture, The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980).

Monday November 16, 2015 | by Andrew Page

Today is the 100th birthday of the iconic Coca-Cola bottle design

Filed under: Design, Museums, News

Even though aluminum cans and plastic bottles predominate, there's something about an ice-cold Coca-Cola served in its signature voluptous glass bottle that never fails to impress. The thick glass, shaped to perfectly fit into the hand and with raised lettering, telegraphs ripeness in its organic hourglass form. The patent for this design was issued on November 16, 1915, making today the centennial of this celebrated product packaging that is known around the world. The original design is referenced today in a variety of packaging materials for the world's best-selling soft drink. But it is in the greenish glass blottle that the form is most powerful, providing a visual and tactile sensuality that retains its power despite the proliferation of sophisticated package design in the century since. The story of how this quintessential design came to be is little-known and quite amusing.

Continue Reading

The Iittala "City Birds" collection is limited to five cities and must be purchased in each of these five geographically distant urban centers.

Wednesday October 7, 2015 | by Andrew Page

Iittala launches limited-edition “City Bird” series with an eye on social media

Filed under: Design, New Work, News

In a bid to update its 40-year-old line of Tokkia birds, and to give the series a little cutting-edge social media juice, the 135-year-old Finnish glass house Iittala is launching a limited edition of its famous blown-glass birds only available in select markets for which they were named. Only 200 numbered examples of the blown-glass "City Bird" collection will be hand-made, and obsessive collectors must travel to Shanghai, Toyko, Paris, New York, and Helsinki to buy them all.

Continue Reading

The 3D molten glass printer developed by MIT can create a diverse range of objects by pouring a stream of hot glass.

Wednesday September 2, 2015 | by Lindsay Woodruff

3-D Glass Printing Heats Up

Filed under: Design, News

Glass, one of the most useful materials at our disposal but one of the hardest to handle, has been a final frontier of sorts in the world of 3-D printing. Even as approaches to printing materials like plastics, polymers, wax, ceramics, and metals, have been increasingly refined, glass has been mostly relegated to crude attempts to form with digital printers that approximate a glass effect. That may be about to change. Driven by the transformative potential that 3-D printed glass could have in art, architecture, medicine, aerospace, communications, safety and security, and more, researchers and engineers, are making progress in overcoming the inherent obstacles to 3-D glass printing (3DGP). Years' worth of experimentation and invention has led to the groundbreaking innovations we have seen this summer - Micron3DP, an Israeli company that designs and manufactures 3-D printer parts, announced a prototype of a new high-temperature extruder printe in June, and MIT recently announced the 3-D hot glass printer developed by the Mediated Matter Group in collaboration with MIT's Department of Mechnical Engineering and MIT's Glass Lab.

Continue Reading

GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.