Viewing: Call for Submissions


Former Corning Museum of Glass director and curator David Whitehouse (1941 - 2013). courtesy: corning museum of glass

Friday June 23, 2017 | by Lindsay Hargrave

CALL FOR ENTRIES: A new residency allows artists time to research at Corning’s Rakow Library

The Corning Museum of Glass announced a new artist residency program, only this one won’t take place in their studio, but instead in their library. The David Whitehouse Artist Residency for Research will offer one artist up to three weeks in The Corning Museum's Rakow Library, which they are free to peruse (along with the museum’s permanent collection) in any sort of research effort to expand their knowledge of glass technique and history. This residency is similar to the Rakow Grant, which the Corning Museum offers to scholars to conduct research, but the Rakow is reserved for scholars alone and does not necessarily have to take place on site. The Whitehouse residency, on the other hand, is exclusively for artists, is completely onsite, and can last from one to three weeks. The deadline to apply is August 31, 2017.

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The exterior of Chihuly Garden and Glass in Seattle as pictured on its website.

Wednesday May 24, 2017 | by Lindsay Hargrave

SCHOLARSHIP: Chihuly Garden and Glass offers $10,000 for Seattle-area emerging glass artist

In honor of its fifth anniversary, Chihuly Garden and Glass, the for-profit long-term Chihuly exhibition in Seattle Center, is offering a $10,000 scholarship for an emerging glass artist in the Seattle region to take classes at either Pilchuck Glass School or Pratt Fine Arts Center. The program is offered in conjunction with the Chihuly Studio. Though announced through Facebook and a press release, information on how to apply for this opportunity hasn't been easy to locate. The application is on the Garden and Glass website, but only under "Events," where it comes up at the bottom of an article about the organization's fifth-anniversary activities. Still, this is a generous opportunity, one of a series of initiatives to give back to the glass art community, and worthy of attention for every Seattle-area glass artist who fits the criteria.

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2016 TIGA Artist-in-Residence, Matthew Szösz, Ampere's Law. glass fiber. courtesy: artist website.

Tuesday May 23, 2017 | by Gabi Gimson

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Toyama, Japan, glass program’s artist-in-residence program open to applicants

The Toyama City Institute of Glass Art (TIGA) is now accepting applications for its sought-after artist-in-residence program, set to take place October 19 to November 29, 2017. Each year, TIGA selects one artist of any glassmaking discipline to work and live for six weeks in Toyama, Japan, aptly dubbed “Glass Town”—a seaside city with a 400 year-old crafts tradition. TIGA’s artist-in-residence program was established in 2010 to invigorate the local community and promote Toyama’s rich cultural and arts heritage. Former artists-in-residence, selected from an international and diverse group of applicants, include Anna Mlasowsky (2011), Ethan Stern (2012), Ben Wright (2013), Pavlina Cambalova (2015), and Matthew Szösz (2016). The current faculty includes head professor Jin Hongo and associate professor Amy Rueffert.

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Artists from the 2016 Residency at Salem State. courtesy: The Glassworks Studio at Salem State University Facebook page.

Wednesday March 29, 2017 | by Awura Ama Barnie-Duah

CALL FOR ENTRIES: Salem State University seeks artists for its Rosenberg Residency

In June 2017, The Rosenberg Residency at Salem State University, now in its fifth year, will offer month-long access to its glassblowing facilities for four artists to pursue individual and group projects.

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Thursday February 2, 2017 | by Andrew Page

CALL FOR PAPERS: October 2017 UrbanGlass academic symposium to focus on post-graduate outcomes

For its third biennial academic symposium, UrbanGlass is again partnering with the Robert M. Minkoff Foundation to present an international gathering of department heads, professors, and educators to discuss best practices in the lecture hall and studio. The upcoming symposium, titled "Issues in Glass Pedagogy: Curriculum and Career," will take place from October 12 -14, 2017 in New York City, and will examine the factors that determine students' post-graduate success. Among the areas of interest are investigations into the economic challenges facing professional contemporary artists, as well as the educational interventions that are most effective in preparing graduates to thrive. The symposium organizers are now accepting proposals for lecture presentations, panel dicussions, and studio demonstrations that address how academic curricula and programs can affect career outcomes, with a special focus on best practices, statistical analysis, and case studies.

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The top works will be exhibited at the Glasmuseet Ebeltoft, with the top prize of 10,000-Euro also including a solo exhibition at this Denmark institution.

Sunday August 14, 2016 | by Andrew Page

CALL FOR ENTRIES: Once-a-decade museum competition anoints new talent, offers multiple prizes

Since the inaugural “Young Glass” exhibition in 1987, the Glasmuseet Ebeltoft in Denmark has held an international competitive exhibition of up-and-coming artists every 10 years. The fourth iteration of this juried exhibition, which includes a top award of a 2017 solo museum exhibition and a 10,000-Euro cash prize, is now accepting submissions. With a deadline of December 1, 2016, the competition is open to all students, artists, designers, and craftspeople using glass as a key element in their work. Because of the stated goal to identify new talent, there is a strict age limit. To apply, you must have been born after January 1, 1982, which will mean the finalists will not be over 35 when announced in 2017.

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The Visiting Artist residency doubles as a demonstration for visitors to the Museum of Glass in Tacoma hotshop. Pictured: artist Courtney Branam.

Thursday August 11, 2016 | by Andrew Page

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Tacoma Museum of Glass has four open slots for visiting artists in 2017

The Museum of Glass in Tacoma is accepting applications for four Visiting Artist slots in 2017. The program offers a short (up to 5 days of hotshop time) but intensive opportunity to work with the museum's crew, as well as two days of basic cold-working. While work made during the residency remains the property of the artist, residents are "encouraged to donate two works" — one chosen in consultation with the artistic director for the museum's collection – and the other donated to the annual fundraising auction. Artists are also responsible for their own travel, accommodations, color powders, as well as packing and shipping of all work after the residency.

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Pavlina Cambalova was the 2015 artist in residence at Toyama.

Tuesday June 21, 2016 | by Sarah Canny

CALL FOR ENTRIES: Still time to apply for 6-week artist residency in Toyama, Japan

The Toyama City Institute of Glass Art in Japan is accepting applications for its annual 6-week artist-in-residence program that will take place from October 20 through November 30, 2016. The application materials state the residency will go to a glass artist "who has potential to stimulate the glass art scene in Toyama by his/her works, regardless of age, gender and techniques he/she utilizes." The successful applicant will have access to a full suite of facilities to create his or her own work in a supportive and enthusiastic environment. The work made by the resident artist will receive a solo exhibition.  Along with creating, the artist is expected to participate in lectures and demonstrations, and to interact and share his or her knowledge and experience with the many students and fellow artists on campus. 

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The "Oled Moon Chandelier" by Dominic Harris & Cinimod Studio places OLED panels inside a polished acrylic sphere, and is featured on the OLEDWorks Website.

Wednesday May 11, 2016 | by Andrew Page

CALL FOR ENTRIES: Design competition offers $10,000 award for OLED “Lighting without a Bulb” contest

Lesser known than their more commercially developed LED counterparts, OLEDs generate broad-spectrum light that is far closer to the light cast by incandescent light bulbs than the harsh whiteness associated with LEDs. An OLED is a sandwich made up of an organic material layered between two electrodes, and these layers are deposited (they can be printed with an ink-ket) onto a transparent substrate. The many advantages of OLED technology — better quality of light, potentially lower cost than LED if mass produced, cool temperatures, higher response times if used for displays versus backlit LCD screens — must be balanced against the comparatively shorter lifespan and changing color balance over time, problems that are being addressed by researchers. Advances in OLED engineering hold great potential for the technology not only for touch-screens (where they are already being used in some smartphones), but for ambient lighting as well. A new design competition co-sponsored by Corning Inc. and the OLEDWorks company, is seeking innovative lighting designs incorporating today's OLED technology, and is offering $10,000 cash awards as well as opportunities to develop prototypes for winning ideas.

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In 2015, Saman Kalantari took the top $5,000 award for Flexible Glass Sheet (FGS), a combination of glass frit and powder on paper.

Thursday April 28, 2016 | by Andrew Page

Call for Submissions: The Glass Art Society looks to fund cutting-edge approaches to the material

The Glass Art Society is currently accepting applications for the third iteration of its Technology Advancing Glass Grant, which is designed to support projects breaking new ground in material, technique, or method, to advance the practice of making art with glass. Up to $5,000 will be awarded to the top applications for the 2016-17 fiscal year. Last year, the glass-frit-and-paper experiments of Iranian artist Saman Kalantari took top honors, with runners-up Michal Czeisler, Jin Won Han, and a collaborative group from the Chrysler Museum of Art Glass Studio and the NASA Langley Research Center each receiving $2,000 for their projects. It appears the budget for the upcoming awards will be held to a total of $5,000 versus the $11,000 awarded in 2015.

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GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.