Monday November 22, 2010 | by Andrew Page

Three Hilltop students exhibit work at Vetri Glass in Tacoma

Filed under: Uncategorized

John Wright, Cylinder, 2010. Blown glass and ink. H 20, D 3 1/4 in. photo: ben lerman.

For the sixth time, Vetri Glass has opened its doors to artists from the Hilltop Artists in Residence program for an exhibition of student work. Hilltop uses the intensity and focus glass requires to teach valuable lessons to at-risk youth, as we’ve traced in articles in GLASS magazine and the Hot Sheet about how the hotshop environment can capture the imagination of students and open up new pathways toward artistic expression. The results of three Hilltop students’ glass education can be seen at Vetri in an exhibition of the work of John Wright, Donete Scott and Eli Piercey that will be on display through December 18, 2010.

As part of their arts education, the Hilltop students were required to present portfolios to Vetri for consideration in the student show, and these three were selected. Vetri donates 25 percent of the sales price of their work is donated back to the Hilltop program.

Doneté Scott, Bowl, 2010. Blown glass. H 6 1/4 in. photo: ben lerman

The Hilltop program is summed up by the following mission statement: “Using glass art to connect young people from diverse cultural and economic backgrounds to a better future.” The Vetri show is just one of several selling exhibitions that help raise funds for the Hilltop program. A holiday glass sale will take place on December 11th, 2010, at a local school.

To learn more about the Hilltop program, visit their Website. You can also view a video that includes extensive interviews with students enrolled in the program below.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv332ahcCQA]

IF YOU GO:

“Featured Hilltop Artists: John Wright, Doneté Scott and Eli Piercey”
Through December 12th, 2010
Vetri Glass Tacoma
1821 E Dock Street #101
Tacoma, Washington 98402
Tel: 253 383 3692
Email: vetritacoma@vetriglass.com

GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.