Viewing articles by Hailey Clark


Dale Chihuly, Rose Blush Macchia Studio Edition, 2017. Blown Glass. H 6, W 9, H 9 in. courtesy: schantz galleries

Tuesday March 28, 2017 | by Hailey Clark

Released in limited variety each year, Chihuly’s Studio Editions offer more accessible prices

Filed under: Announcements, News

Hand blown, smaller-scale, and created in multiples, each year's crop of Studio Editions reference some of the best-known unique works by Dale Chihuly, perhaps the best-known artist working with glass, whose signature adorns each one. Each season since 2012, the Chihuly Workshop has released four new studio editions, part of a series designed to offer Chihuly works at a more affordable price-point. These are available at galleries specializing in glass such as Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

Continue Reading

Philip Baldwin and Monica Guggisberg, Boat People, 2016. Blown and carved glass, brass hammered hull. H 20 W 105 D 19 cm. photo: alex ramsay

Sunday March 26, 2017 | by Hailey Clark

New work by Baldwin and Guggisberg at Sandra Ainsley Gallery extends ongoing boat series

Filed under: Exhibition, New Work, News

Husband and wife artistic collaborators Philip Baldwin and Monica Guggisberg continue to explore the metaphor of journey in their exhibition Thinking in Glass that runs through May 6, 2017, at the Sandra Ainsley gallery in Toronto. Assemblages of blown forms gathered into water craft is not new to this artistic duo, who have been experimenting with boat vessels since their initial series, "Sentinel" in the mid-1990s.

Continue Reading

Artist Sarah Mizer at work in the studio.

Wednesday March 22, 2017 | by Hailey Clark

3 Questions for ... Sarah Mizer

Glass artist, Sarah Mizer, explores polarization, overindulgence, and nostalgia in her exhibition "Of Most Excellent Fancy," on view through April 1, 2017 at a project space in Laurel Park, North Carolina, that is the contemporary art component of a novel retail wine market called the Crate Project. Drawing inspiration from Vanitas Dutch still life imagery, and dialog from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Mizer created three groups of art forms that reside on individual walls. Each set of works evoke a sense of conflicting ideas, such as life and death, like Vanitas imagery, while incorporating her own experiences from her time as an artist residence at the Penland School of Crafts. In these three questions, Mizer expands on how her botanical studies mesh with 17th-century sources of inspiration.

GLASS Quarterly Hot Sheet: What are you working on?
Sarah Mizer: When asked what am I up to I get excited to sum it up so simply: travel. Though based in Richmond, Virginia, travel is an important factor in generating imagery. “Of Most Excellent Fancy”, the show mounted at Crate Project in Laurel Park, North Carolina came to fruition while in residence at Penland just at the start of the new year. At Crate, you will see work mostly comprised of Penland plants rejoined as brittle and precarious still lifes. I was at Penland for their Winter Residency so the imagery is droopy, cold, and a little anemic. Meanwhile today on the schedule (worlds and seasons apart from Penland), I'm trying to find a birthday present for my mother somewhere in the souk while visiting Doha, Qatar. I'm here for a week and have some time today before the opening of “form(force)”, a juried exhibition of VCU faculty work fitting into the theme of  "Analog Living in a Digital World." My contribution to the show is a still life construction titled "Sweet and Bitter at the Same Time". This work is a still life piece which incorporates a digitally printed lemon, glass, light, and faux greenery that has been resurfaced with a white coat. To be in such an arid desert landscape with a piece that is comprised of counterfeited imagery as a stand in for lush nature, it's all so surreal.

Continue Reading

Penland School of Crafts, Inspired: Life In Penland's Resident Artist and Core Fellowship Programs, cover. courtesy of Penland School of crafts

Wednesday March 8, 2017 | by Hailey Clark

BOOK REPORT: Penland publishes a lavish celebration of its unique residency program

In many words and pictures, Penland School of Crafts' new book, entitled Inspired: Life In Penland’s Resident Artists and Core Fellowship Programs, tells the story of this North Carolina craft center's mission and artist outcomes through the voices of its staff and 32 of the artist residents. These voices share their positive experiences during their time in residency, whether it was for 8 months or the uniquely long 3 year fellowship, and how they benefited from the institution's educational and residency programs. Over the course of 192 pages, this new coffeetable book delves into the history of Penland, first founded in the 1920s (it established its first glass program in 1965), and the core reason for its existence: to provide the perfect balance of solidarity and isolation for upmost creative growth. This hardcover book, according to Penland executive director Jean McLaughlin on page 8, "aim[s] to acknowledge the remarkable near-fifty-year history of these two programs and begin to document this history through the stories of participating artists." 

Continue Reading

Kazuki Takizawa, The Minimalist, 2015-2017. Blown glass sculpture. courtesy: the artist

Thursday February 23, 2017 | by Hailey Clark

OPENING: Kazuki Takizawa takes on weighty topic in upcoming solo exhibition at major craft gallery

Visitors to an upcoming exhibition by glass artist Kazuki Takizawa will experience a unique aural experience thanks to the artist having suspended colored glass bulbs, enclosed in a swaying metal structure, as part of “Catharsis Contained,” which will open at Craft In America Center in Los Angeles in May 2017. The work entitled Breaking the Silence II is designed so that it has a rocking motion that will cause the blown bulbs to gently bump into one another, producing a soothing, tinkling sound that was inspired by Takizawa's experience of visiting a temple in Thailand. Not only will this installation provide a sonic atmosphere to accompany the rich visual experience of his repeated glass forms in various subdued hues, but the artwork also seeks to develop a conversation about a topic rarely engaged in art: suicide prevention. 

Continue Reading

Tobias Klein, Virtual Sunset II, 2013. Installation. courtesy: the artist

Tuesday February 21, 2017 | by Hailey Clark

The 2017 lineup of Pilchuck artists in residence links up with the theme of each summer session

Filed under: Announcements, Education, News

A mix of artists, designers, and new-technology innovators have been invited to travel to the remote Stanwood, Washington, campus of Pilchuck this summer as part of the glass school's annual artists-in-residence program. These residents will explore how glass might dovetail with their own artistic vision, and will be assisted by highly-skilled glass gaffers. In the process, their presence is designed to act as a creative catalyst for the unique mix of students who come together each summer, drawn by this legendary school's unique approach to exploring expression and artistic exchange through the material of glass. Since being named permanent artistic director of the program in 2013, visual artist and educator Tina Aufiero has designed each summer's program, and she selected this year's artists in residence and instructors. (For an in-depth profile of Aufiero, see the Winter 2016-17 edition of GLASS (#145).)

Continue Reading

Black Iris Vase, 1909. Porcelaneous earthenware. collection: newark museum

Wednesday February 15, 2017 | by Hailey Clark

OPENING: The Newark Museum explores art boundaries with upcoming exhibit

Filed under: Exhibition, Museums, Opening

On February 22, 2017, the Newark Museum will open a provocative exhibition titled "When Objects Became Art," which presents early twentieth-century glass and ceramic works from its private collection to foster a new understanding of the dividing line between decorative and fine art. 

Continue Reading

GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.