Issue 132 | Fall

Hourglass

Major Erwin Eisch retrospective at German art foundation; Chihuly counterfeit case a cautionary tale for buying art online; in memoriam: Jonathan Christie (1968 - 2013); exhibition inspired by Blaschka Glass Flowers opens at Pittsburgh Glass Center; in memoriam: Alice Chappell (1942 - 2013); Museum of Glass in Tacoma announces $1 million gift, new board president; Corning contributes images of works in glass to the Google Art Project; in memoriam: Jiri Harcuba (1928 - 2013)

Reviews

Group exhibition at the Fondazione Giorgio Cini in Venice, Italy; glass beads at the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York; group exhibition at Blue Rain Gallery, Santa Fe; Jospeh Cavalieri at the Society for Arts and Crafts, Boston

UrbanGlass News

A letter from executive director Cybele Maylone; new, lower studio rates for experimental work at UrbanGlass

Reflection

by James Yood

Across the lagoon from the struggling glassmakers of Murano, Venice becomes a stage for international contemporary artists using glass.

Features

Cast of Light

by Robin Rice

Dan Clayman's pure forms are a stage for his exquisitely controlled theater of texture, shadow, illumination, and ideas.

The Spirit of Experimentation

by Gina DeCagna and Andrew Page

From the rough-and-tumble early days as the New York Experimental Glass Workshop on Great Jones Street in Manhattan -- to the move to Mulberry Street, a short walk from the the SoHo gallery scene-- to the jump across the river to an expanded facility in gritty Downtown Brooklyn, the evolution of UrbanGlass as a crucible for creativity is best told in the words of those who were there.

Life Cycle

by Harold Duckett

Richard Jolley's monumental museum installation will be the largest work -- and biggest risk -- of his career.

Rough Edges

by Andrew Page

For 25 years, John Drury and Robbie Miller's CUD project has been a mashed-up, recycled, community art project before those terms came into vogue.

GLASS: The UrbanGlass Quarterly, a glossy art magazine published four times a year by UrbanGlass has provided a critical context to the most important artwork being done in the medium of glass for 35 years.